What happens when a domain drops. In short: you lose it. You'll be told that your domain was dropped because you didn't pay your bill, but in reality, there are loopholes around this rule which make it very easy for anyone with a properly registered domain name to lose their registration at any time. The only way to keep a domain registration from dropping is by renewing it within the allotted time after it expires, usually via an automated system.

When a domain registration gets dropped, it goes back into the pool of available names on the market, and whoever wants to register it can do so (for a...hefty fee). The general consensus is that when you buy a used car...the previous owner didn't really want to sell it in the first place. When you lose your domain name through expiration or non-renewal. it's almost like somebody wanted to delete their online presence.

There are many reasons why you might end up losing your website's domain; here are just a few:

1. Your company goes out of business, or the person who registered the domain falls out of favor with his/her company.

2. You decide to move to a new host and forget to "park" your domain at the new registrar, allowing it to expire.

3. You decide you no longer want to be associated with a certain website and let its registration lapse, not realizing that it will then go back into circulation as a free domain for anybody else who wants it.

4. Someone forgets to pay their bill on time (and can't get a hold of anybody from the hosting company's support team). It's possible that the registrar won't delete an account until they've been given proof from someone within your company stating that your services are no longer required. In other words, if you're the only technical person in your company and nobody can get a hold of you as you travel across Asia catching Pokemon, someone might try to delete your account to save on fees...leaving your domain up for grabs.

5. The registrar's registration system automatically deletes domains after a certain period of time has elapsed without a renewal payment being made (this is usually around 5 years, but could be sooner or later depending on your registrar). You should always set up an auto-pay from your credit card to avoid this from happening.

6. Because of how ICANN works, registrars can't keep free domains forever! They have to periodically purge their stockpile of unused domains, deleting any registrations that are older than 60 days, forcing you to go through the renewal process (and pay) for your domains. If they don't do this, their license with ICANN could be terminated.

7. You misspelled or mistyped your domain name when you were registering it. this happens more often than you might think! This is the easiest way to lose a free domain.

8. Your domain wasn't properly "parked" at your registrar before it went into expiration, allowing someone to pick it up and use it in an unrelated website/business/etc.before transferring it away, netting them an easy $10-20 convenience fee for the transfer along with whatever profit they might've made on the domain itself. Some registrars use a system where you can't transfer domains away until they're 5 days into their "post-expiration grace period." This is why it's important to use your registrar's official website, and not a third party site/business that tries to sell you the same service: if your domain gets bought out from under you by someone else, it will be much harder for you to get it back than if you had paid attention and locked it down as soon as your renewal date rolled around.

9. You might have missed an email - or two - warning you about the impending expiration of your domain name(s). Perhaps these emails got caught up in all those robo-calls sent out by political organizations or by telemarketers looking to sign you up for various spammy newsletters.

10. You might have moved your hosting service to a new account with a new registrar but failed to update your domain settings. For example, changing the name servers so that they point directly towards the new host's IP addresses is vital in making sure that any DNS updates are applied properly and thus letting outside visitors see the website at its new location on the web.

11. You might have moved your hosting service to a new account with the same registrar but failed to update your domain settings. For example, changing the name servers so that they point directly towards the new host's IP addresses is vital in making sure that any DNS updates are applied properly and thus letting outside visitors see the website at its new location on the web.

12. You might have moved your hosting service to a new account with the same registrar but failed to update your WHOIS record. This will be required when transferring domains away from another registrar or maintaining contact information for any domain registrations you own.

So what should you do if this happens?

1) Contact your host immediately - they may have some additional flexibility that can help restore an expired domain name in instances where it was accidentally deleted early (which would require compensation to offset lost revenue). Some hosts are willing to reinstate an account that's up for deletion in exchange for a refund of the missed renewal fees in addition to a small penalty fee.

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